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Beirut Port Explosion , Situation Report N.8

Situation Report

Almost three months after the blast that rocked the Lebanese capital city of Beirut, urgent needs for protection, food, health, shelter and WASH remain critical. The loss of livelihoods, compounded by the current COVID-19 outbreak, as well as the country’s financial and economic crises,  have raised the demand for substantial and long-term humanitarian assistance. In this context, the UN and partners are actively engaged in the development of the World Bank Group, European Union and UN Reform, Recovery and Reconstruction Framework (3RF) – a critical step in the transition from immediate humanitarian programmes to more sustainable interventions and support for recovery and reconstruction.

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A RAPID GENDER ANALYSIS OF THE AUGUST 2020 BEIRUT PORT EXPLOSION: An Intersectional Examination

Publication

On August 4 2020, the devastating Beirut explosion shook the whole city to its core, taking the lives of 191 persons (120 males, 58 females, and 13 unspecified), wounding at least 6,500, and leaving 300,000 people displaced. Prior to the explosion, Lebanon’s crisis has been underpinned by extreme structural gender inequalities: Lebanon ranks 145 out of 153 countries in the World Economic Forum Global Gender Gap Report, due to low rates of women’s economic and political participation and patriarchal socio-cultural norms. The impact of the explosion compounded with the worst economic crisis in the history of Lebanon and the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to significantly push back what gains have been made on gender equality in the country.

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Beirut Explosion Situation Report No.7

Situation Report

Almost two months and a half after the Beirut explosion of 4 August, Lebanon finds itself in an increasingly difficult and volatile situation as the country struggles with both political turmoil and a humanitarian crisis. According to the Lebanese Armed Forces, the explosion resulted in 202 fatalities, while 9 people (3 Lebanese, 5 Syrians and 1 Egyptian) are still reported missing. Already ravaged by the 4 August explosion, 9 October was a frightening day for Lebanon as well. A fire, caused by the explosion of a fuel tank, broke out in Beirut’s western neighbourhood of Tariq al-Jadide, resulting in four deaths and more than 30 injuries. On that same day, massive forest fires erupted in several areas across Lebanon, mainly in the southern areas of Jezzine, Nabatieh and Tyre as well as the Chouf and North Lebanon. In Tyre, UNIFIL helicopters were deployed to extinguish the fires as they edged toward residents' homes.

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Beirut Explosion Situation Report No.6

Situation Report

Almost two months after the explosion that rocked the Lebanese capital on 4 August, the situation in the country remains critical. In addition to the serious humanitarian crisis, Lebanon continues to face a political crisis as Lebanon’s prime minister-designate announced his resignation on 26 September after failing to form a non-partisan cabinet. This is further compounded by a severe financial crisis with the loss of 80 per cent of its currency value since October 2019.Meanwhile, restoring shelters, rehabilitating infrastructure, securing food and protecting lives remain humanitarian response priorities, especially in view of the approaching winter. Interventions are also focusing on comprehensive and affordable primary healthcare and mental health and psychosocial support services.

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Joint Rapid Multi-Sectoral Gender Assessment (RMGA) on the Beirut Blast: The Impact of the Beirut Blast on Women

Publication

On Wednesday August 4, 2020, at 6:08pm, two explosions rocked the Lebanese capital causing widespread casualties and material damage. As a result, close to 200 people lost their lives, an unknown number remain missing, and more than 6000 people are injured. Based on the estimates from the government, more than 300,000 people have lost their homes – with more than 50,000 housing units affected. The public devastation and outrage from the explosion has generated a new wave of protests across the country.

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Primary Healthcare Centers Assessment, Post Beirut Explosion

Publication

On August 4, 2020, an explosion at the Beirut Port devastated the city and its citizens with a shockwave that spread for kilometers. Before the explosion, fires fulminated throughout dock number 12, resulting in blooming smoke of black and purple. This smoke would serve as a harbinger for the catastrophic explosion that eventually resulted in more than 170 casualties, more than 50 people missing, 6,000 injured and approximately 300,000 residents displaced.

 

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Beirut Explosion Situation Report No.5

Situation Report

When a large quantity of ammonium nitrate exploded on 4 August, Lebanon was already in the middle of an unprecedented economic crisis. Now, more than 40 days after the explosion that killed nearly 200 people and injured more than 6,000, Lebanon’s humanitarian and financial needs are exacerbated. Within five kilometres of the explosion site, residential and commercial areas were destroyed or severely damaged, leaving 300,000 people homeless. It is expected that some households may be displaced for an indefinite period of time. For example, in the Quarantina neighborhood, assessments indicate a timeline of up to one year for people to return to their homes. Moreover, on Thursday 10 September, another massive fire broke out in a warehouse full of tires and oil, this time at the port’s free zone, the same area that was heavily damaged in the initial explosion. 

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Beirut Explosion Situation Report No.4

Situation Report

A month has passed since large quantities of ammonium nitrate at a warehouse in the Beirut port exploded, causing massive humanitarian and financial losses. According to the Ministry of Public Health, the death toll has reached 190, with three people still missing, more than 6,000 injured, and more than 300,000 displaced. In addition, many people are showing symptoms of severe psychological distress. The Rapid Damage and Needs Assessment (RDNA), launched by the World Bank Group (WBG), in cooperation with the United Nations (UN) and the European Union (EU), determined that the blast caused between $3.8 and $4.6 billion in damages to infrastructure and physical stock. With a major focus on the worst affected areas within a five-kilometre radius of the explosion site, the RDNA covered 16 sectors, including health, housing, education, culture and social protection and jobs.

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Beirut Explosion Situation Report No.3

Situation Report

Nearly two weeks after powerful blasts occurred on 4 August, at a warehouse at the Beirut Port containing large quantities of ammonium nitrate, widespread damage across several areas continues to cause human suffering and the extent of the crisis continues to become more clear.  As of 26 August, OCHA reports that the death toll reached 180, with over 7,000 injured and more than 300,000 people displaced, with many showing symptoms of severe psychological distress. These numbers are expected to rise as more bodies are recovered from the surrounding wreckage, while dozens of people are still reported missing. 

The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that more than 80 primary health care centres have been severely damaged. According to the UNFPA assessment of 55 primary healthcare facilities within 5 kilometers of the blast,  less than 50 percent of the centers reported that they maintained the full package of sexual and reproductive health services, including maternal and newborn care, and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs).  Almost 71 per cent of health facilities are still functional but only 47 per cent of surveyed facilities can provide full routine health services. Moreover, 120 schools, attended by 55,000 children, sustained various levels of damage. Humanitarian partners are conducting further damage assessments, in close coordination with relevant government authorities. 

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Beirut Explosion Situation Report No.2

Situation Report

On 4 August 2020, at approximately 18:00, a warehouse at the Beirut Port containing large quantities of ammonium nitrate exploded. The initial explosion was followed by a much more substantial blast that caused widespread damage, reportedly reaching more than 20 kilometres from the port area. 

As of 18 August, reports indicate that the death toll has reached 220, with over 7,000 injured and more than 300,000 people left displaced, with many showing symptoms of severe psychological distress. These numbers  are expected to rise as more bodies are recovered from the surrounding wreckage and dozens of people are still reported missing. The situation is further exacerbated by rising confirmed cases of COVID-19. 

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